Writing Mathematical Equations in Ulysses

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Eline, originally from The Netherlands, is currently doing an English Language and Linguistics Master and is a member of The Soulmen’s support team. In her column, she responds to some of the most frequently asked questions and share support answers that could be of interest for more Ulysses users out there.

Ulysses isn’t just used by those who write fiction – it is also suited for mathematicians and other scientists that have to include equations in their writing. In this blog post, we will present you with two of the most commonly used workflows: on the one hand, you can use LateX to write your equations, rendering them with Pandoc. On the other hand, you can use MathJax, a powerful web-based script which can render your equations in HTML.

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Quick, Quicker, Quick Export

With Ulysses, exporting is fast — your text in a beautifully formatted PDF, as an ebook or a WordPress blog post is always just a few clicks away. This tip for Mac users is about making export even faster, thanks to keyboard controlled navigation of the Quick Export panel.

If you love to work without having to reach for the mouse too often, you’re probably aware that, in Ulysses, you can evoke Quick Export with the shortcut ⌘6 (command-6). Now, did you know that you can control the Quick Export panel for the most part with your keyboard, too? There’s only little you need to memorize:
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Alternative Blogging Platforms & Future-Proofing Your Works

1480px_eline2@2x-1

Eline, originally from The Netherlands, is currently doing an English Language and Linguistics Master and is leading The Soulmen’s support team. In her column, she responds to some of the most frequently asked questions and shares support answers that could be of interest for more Ulysses users out there.

Posting on Other Platforms Than WordPress or Medium

Now that Ulysses allows for direct posting on WordPress and Medium blogs, we get increasingly more requests about publishing on other popular platforms such as Ghost and Squarespace. Here’s how it works.

When publishing to Ghost and Squarespace, it’s important to know Ulysses doesn’t offer a direct way for doing so yet. Instead, both platforms offer a Markdown editor into which you can paste your works.

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Import Your Vesper Notes Into Ulysses

A few days ago, the creators of the notes app Vesper announced to end its development and eventually shut down the sync server. Being in this industry ourselves, we can understand that making this move isn’t easy, and we’re sorry for both the developers and the Vesper users who grew fond of the tool. If you’re a Vesper user and considering Ulysses as a future replacement, this post is for you. To ease migrating your notes from Vesper to Ulysses, we’ve created a small tool which lets you do exactly that.

Screenshot Dock Ulysses Vesper Importer

Here’s how you can import your existing notes into Ulysses:

  1. Open Vesper, go to the Sidebar and select “Export”. Tap “Export Notes and Pictures” and select a location where to export your notes to. For instance, you could export your notes to your iCloud Drive folder.
  2. Download the Ulysses Vesper Importer and launch it.
  3. Drag your exported Vesper folder into the window and click “Save Sheets…”.
  4. A Finder window will open. Simply drag the selected folder onto Ulysses dock icon or into its sidebar.

That’s it – your Vesper notes are now available in Ulysses’ text library.

Screenshot Vesper Ulysses Importer

The import should be fast and work smoothly. Should you encounter any problems, please don’t hesitate to get in touch via the feedback form.

For Better Focus: Typewriter Mode, Revamped

What’s new in Ulysses 2.6? In a series of blog posts, we’ll closely look at each of its new features and examine how they can help writers to get their work done.

MacBook, Typewriter Mode enabled

An earlier implementation of the new Typewriter Mode was actually part of Ulysses for Mac since 2013. With version 2.6, Typewriter Mode was revamped and finally made it to iPad and iPhone.

Typewriter Mode – you guessed it – got its name because it mimics the behavior of mechanic typewriters in some respects. Some older users may even remember how it was to write on these! Writing on a computer instead has many advantages, but there’s one thing typewriters were actually very good at: letting writers focus on their texts. And better focus is exactly what Ulysses’ Typewriter Mode aims for.

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Saving Life Time: Quick Open on iPad and iPhone

What’s new in Ulysses 2.6? In a series of blog posts, we’ll closely look at each of its new features and examine how they can help writers to get their work done.

Quick Open is part of Ulysses for Mac since its launch back in 2013. When Ulysses for iOS came out last year, users missed the feature sadly, and kept asking for it. Well, it is finally there! Quick Open is, in short, meant to save you time and effort. You can search your entire library within seconds, and instantly open a sheet for editing, without the need to navigate through your group hierarchies. Sounds like a small thing? Hey, if you only save only 10 seconds per sheet thanks to Quick Open, and you’re looking for 6 sheets per day for the next 30 years, this sums up to 8 days in total! Time you could spend on vacation or use to write a short story, for example. Read …

Individual Group Icons

Groups

Did you know that Ulysses allows to customize your group icons? You can use them as visual labels for a better orientation in your text library. This option is available on Mac, iPad and iPhone, and when iCloud is enabled, the icons you selected for groups will sync and appear on all connected devices.

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